Non-food related factors could be why you can’t lose weight. One common and underappreciated factor in is sleep deprivation, according to Malkani. Studies show that poor sleep may lead to an increase in body fat and is a risk factor for obesity. “This is potentially because sleep deprivation affects the production of hormones that regulate hunger and satiety,” Malkani, creator of the Wholitarian Lifestyle, says. Stress or emotional eating has a similarly negative impact on weight. Studies show that extreme dieting increases cortisol, the stress hormone, which is known for causing weight gain. Malkani adds that adopting healthy alternatives to mood-triggered eating—like taking a walk, meditating, or taking with a friend—are healthy tools for dealing with stress rather than distracting yourself with food.

Furthermore, when you are reducing calories the body’s first instinct is to hold onto that belly fat with a vengeance, just in case you are starving and don’t know where the next meal is coming from. After all, your body doesn’t know the difference between a diet and starvation. Therefore, between your 3 main meals have a healthy snack to maintain steady energy levels and avoid junk food binges help you lose belly fat. Eat 3 meals and 2 snacks consisting of all three food groups (carbs, fat and protein) every 3 hours. (Click here for more tips on how to reduce calories.)
Losing belly fat at any age is a challenge, but it seems even more difficult to achieve over age 60. As you age, having a more sedentary lifestyle, changes in hormones and a natural loss of muscle mass makes it more likely that your waistband will expand. To lose belly fat, it's key to combine physical activity and a lower calorie diet that's focused on unprocessed foods. This strategy works to reduce belly fat -- no matter the age in chronological years.
Eat More Produce. Eating lots of low-calorie, high-volume fruits and vegetables crowds out other foods that are higher in fat and calories. Move the meat off the center of your plate and pile on the vegetables. Or try starting lunch or dinner with a vegetable salad or bowl of broth-based soup, suggests Barbara Rolls, PhD, author of The Volumetrics Eating Plan. The U.S. government's 2005 Dietary Guidelines suggest that adults get 7-13 cups of produce daily. Ward says that's not really so difficult: "Stock your kitchen with plenty of fruits and vegetables and at every meal and snack, include a few servings," she says. "Your diet will be enriched with vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, fiber, and if you fill up on super-nutritious produce, you won't be reaching for the cookie jar."
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