For example, dangerous visceral fat — the type of deep fat that tends to accumulate near your belly, surrounding your vital organs — raises the risk for serious conditions, including heart disease, diabetes and many others. According to a report published in the Lancet, as of 2005, globally “Excess body weight was the sixth most important risk factor contributing to the overall burden of disease worldwide.” (1) The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that in 2005 approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide were overweight and that at least 400 million adults were obese.
The authors wanted to compare low-fat vs. low-carb diets, but they also wanted to study genetic and physical makeups that purportedly (their word) could influence how effective each type of diet will be for people. Previous studies had suggested that a difference in a particular genetic sequence could mean that certain people will do better with a low-fat diet. Other studies had suggested that insulin sensitivity may mean that certain people will do better with a low-carb diet.

For breakfast, for example, dress up your oatmeal with berries, leave off the butter and margarine, and maybe even increase the amount of water you use to cook it. Yet another strategy not used in this study but validated in others would be to replace calorie-dense brown sugar or maple syrup with Splenda or sugar-free maple syrup, which would further reduce the calorie density of this breakfast entrée.
When you make your meals, forgo refined grains -- such as white bread and pasta -- for whole grains and fresh, green vegetables. These foods contain fiber, which promotes gut health and these foods also take longer to digest -- so that you won't feel as ravenous when reducing portion sizes. Emphasize lean proteins, such as skinless poultry, eggs, trimmed steak and fish, at every meal. Keep fried foods, sugar, processed snacks, alcohol and full-fat dairy to a minimum. Do include moderate portions of monounsaturated fat and omega-3 fatty acids in your diet, too; this fat should account for 20 to 35 percent of your daily calories. Sources of omega-3 fatty acids include olive oil, fatty fish and nuts.
Sure, you can lose weight quickly. There are plenty of fad diets that work to shed pounds rapidly -- while leaving you feeling hungry and deprived. But what good is losing weight only to regain it? To keep pounds off permanently, it's best to lose weight slowly. And many experts say you can do that without going on a "diet." Instead, the key is making simple tweaks to your lifestyle.
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