Fighting belly fat is 80% healthy diet. Reduce calories by filling yourself up with protein, vegetables, whole grains, and replacing bad habit snacks with good ones. For example, if you have a sugar craving, replace your calorie laden latte with a Muscle Milk lite, one of my favorites, because it has zero sugar and a ton of protein that will satiate while also torching my sugar craving! Another great trick is a sprinkle of cinnamon in your morning coffee or oatmeal- the spice has been shown to help stabilize blood sugar. It also slows the rate at which food exits the stomach, which helps you feel fuller longer.
Here's something else most people probably don't know: Fidgeting is good for you. It's considered a nonexercise physical activity, and it's an important way to burn energy. You get more health benefits if, in addition to exercising, you are a more fidgety, more active person the rest of the day. This means gesturing while you're talking, tapping your foot, just moving around.
Hi :) Im 21yrs old and I'm 5'5. I never had an issue with my body before since i always had a constant weight of 119lbs and had a toned figure without doing anything but over the summer i gained weight and went to 128lbs.....and my stomach looks so unattractive now....and i gained love handles too....i don't know what to do....i don't know how to count calories nor what things i should do to sculpt my body not just stomach but my waist and butt as well........i want my figure back but i don't know the first thing to gain it back.....and i want fast results....im willing to do whatever it takes because its starting to give my self esteem issues and lowering my self confidence....:( and given I'm a student....all i do is sit and study so i can't really go to the gym either...
Luckily, that doesn’t mean you need to dedicate even more time exercising. In fact, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts can slash the time commitment while boosting results. HIIT workouts last about 20 minutes and combine bursts of super-intense exercise with slower recovery phases. This type of workout has been found to help people lose more fat once the workout is over, even though they burn less calories during the workout (since workouts are shorter) and also build muscle, rather than break it down the way conventional cardio does. (3)
Weight loss is mostly about what you eat. You need to reduce your calorie consumption if you want to lose weight. Discipline is very important especially when you’re used to eating anything you want. You need to learn the basics of counting calories to estimate your daily caloric consumption. Otherwise, it would be just like guessing and weight loss won’t be guaranteed.
Picking healthy foods is not as simple as finding a “healthy” brand and sticking to it. Every restaurant and every brand has some dishes and products that are healthier than others. It’s key to look beyond advertised health claims on the front of the box. In fact, research from Washington State University shows that reading food labels can improve weight loss.
Even most personal trainers and athletes agree that the quality of your diet is the No. 1 factor to address in order to lose belly fat. Once you improve your eating habits, ab workouts and core exercises are like the icing on the cake. Doing about 2–4 ab workouts weekly can strengthen and define your midsection while you also work on losing body fat all over through improving your diet, sleep and stress.
Foods that have thermogenic properties burn your calories as you eat them. Protein is highly thermogenic. Animal proteins are more thermogenic than vegetable proteins. Thus, lean meats are the best calorie burning food. When you eat lean meat, you burn about 30 percent of the calories it contains within it just by digesting the food. So, if you eat a 300 calorie chicken breast, you will use about 90 calories to digest it. It’s wise to include some protein in each of your meal. This can be lean chicken, beef, or pork, especially in dinner so that you burn most of the consumed calories through digestion at a time when your body’s metabolism is slower. Just remember, do not fry your lean meat!
Coach Calorie’s Tony Schober agrees. He says that a healthy diet is essential and that people who want to lose abdominal fat should eat more protein. Tom Venuto’s book, Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle, provides a helpful guide for creating a personalized diet plan that is higher in protein and full of healthy carbs and essential fats to reach a healthy weight.
A 2012 study also showed that people on a low-carb diet burned 300 more calories a day – while resting! According to one of the Harvard professors behind the study this advantage “would equal the number of calories typically burned in an hour of moderate-intensity physical activity”. Imagine that: an entire bonus hour of exercise every day, without actually exercising. A later, even larger and more carefully conducted study confirmed the effect, with different groups of people on low-carb diets burning an average of between 200 and almost 500 extra calories per day.
As with the 17 day diet the first 2 phases of the Dukan Diet do not fully comply with the suggested standards because they restrict certain food items from your daily diet and promote low calorie meals which are sometimes below the average. The 3rd and 4th stage though is according to standards and best practices. The list of healthy foods suggested by the Dukan Diet has the same characteristics as the foods suggested in the dietary guidelines.
As women age, weight creeps up too, with the average women gaining about one pound per year in their 40s and 50s, resulting in an added 10 to 15 pounds. The drop in estrogen levels during this time of perimenopause (the years leading up to menopause) contributes to weight gain and can change the way you distribute fat. You may gain weight in your belly more readily than you did in younger years.
SOURCES: WebMD Feature: "With Fruits and Veggies, More Matters." 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, author, The Pocket Idiot's Guide to the New Food Pyramids. Elaine Magee, MPH, RD,author, Comfort Food Makeovers. Brian Wansink, PhD, professor and director, Cornell Food and Brand Lab, Ithaca, N.Y.; author, Mindless Eating. Barbara Rolls, PhD, professor of nutritional sciences; and director, laboratory for the study of human ingestive behaviors, Penn State University; and author, The Volumetrics Eating Plan.
×