“Medicine ball slams are a dynamic, explosive, and highly metabolic exercise that does not simply target one muscle group,” explains trainer and founder of Premier Body & Mind Chris DiVecchio. On the surface, the obvious muscle groups such as the anterior abs, obliques, hams, quads, biceps, and shoulders are the primary movers of this exercise. “However, as time goes on and fatigue sets in, nearly every other muscle in the body in one way or another may become involved as a secondary mover which makes this a total gut blaster,” he adds. Furthermore, adding the side-to-side ball slam versus straight up and down, incorporates more oblique and ab work than 100 crunches could ever compete with.
Conversely, the more food in front of you, the more you’ll eat—regardless of how hungry you are. So instead of using regular dinner plates that range these days from 10 to 14 inches (making them look empty if they’re not heaped with food), serve your main course on salad plates (about 7 to 9 inches wide). Instead of 16-ounce glasses and oversized coffee mugs, return to the old days of 8-ounce glasses and 6-ounce coffee cups.
Close the Kitchen at Night. Establish a time when you will stop eating so you won't give in to the late-night munchies or mindless snacking while watching television. "Have a cup of tea, suck on a piece of hard candy or enjoy a small bowl of light ice cream or frozen yogurt if you want something sweet after dinner, but then brush your teeth so you will be less likely to eat or drink anything else," suggests Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, WebMD's "Recipe Doctor" and the author of Comfort Food Makeovers.
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